PROJECT TEAM

Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison

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Among the leading pioneers of the eco-art movement, the collaborative team of Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison (often referred to simply as “the Harrisons”) have worked for over forty years with biologists, ecologists, architects, urban planners and other artists to initiate collaborative dialogues to uncover ideas and solutions which support biodiversity and community development. The Harrisons’ concept of art embraces a breathtaking range of disciplines. They are historians, diplomats, ecologists, investigators, emissaries and art activists. Their work involves proposing solutions and involves not only public discussion, but also community involvement and extensive mapping and documentation of these proposals in an art context. Past projects have focused on watershed restoration, urban renewal, agriculture and forestry issues and urban ecologies. The Harrisons’ visionary projects have, on occasion, led to changes in governmental policy and have expanded dialogue around previously unexplored issues leading to practical implementations variously in the United States and Europe. There is a large body of literature on their work. They have exhibited extensively in the United States and Europe, and been awarded grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the European Union, the German, Dutch, French and English Governments and have won the following:

  • 1992 Nagoya Biennale, Artec. 2nd prize for “Atempause fur den Sava Fluss”, translated into Japanese.
     
  • 1996 Concrete Association, Award for “California Wash”, for doing the most original concrete work in the USA for that year.
     
  • 2001 inaugural Groenevald Prize awarded for Greenheart Vision, for doing the most for the Dutch land scape in that year.
     
  • 2010 inaugural AWE inspiring Award for arts and the environment, for doing the most to explain Global Warming to the British Public, The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management in association with the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World.
     
  • 2013 NACIS inaugural Corlis Benefidio Award for Imaginative Cartography from the North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS), 2013, a Lifetime Award

Artists and scientists

They are historians, diplomats, ecologists, investigators, emissaries and art activists. Their work involves proposing solutions and involves not only public discussion, but community involvement and extensive mapping and documentation of these proposals in an art context. Past projects have focused on watershed restoration, urban renewal, agriculture and forestry issues and urban ecologies. 


Joshua Harrison – Co- director

Joshua is an accomplished filmmaker, interactive producer and online educator. As and undergraduate, he founded UC Students for Solar Energy, and was instrumental in convincing the University of California at San Diego to add solar engineering to its curriculum, as well incorporating solar water heating to its campus infrastructure. During that period, he organized the first alternative energy fair in Southern California. He later served as policy director for the Ecology Center of Southern California, and did extensive lobbying on coastal and water conservation issues as well as serving as the youngest member of the California Democratic Central Committee. In the 1980's he assisted Newton and Helen Harrison with a number of artworks testing the possibilities of incorporating environmental concepts into everyday life. Josh was a Fulbright fellow in Argentina in 1995 and 1996, investigating the relationship between the author Jorge Luis Borges and then emerging world wide web. He the co-founder and artistic director of the St Barth FIlm festival - dedicated to promoting Caribbean film and film culture, now celebrating its 19th season. He is currently Director of Learning and Performance at Drury Design, design and building interactive curricula and learning programs for major corporate clients.

Kelly Skye – Project and Research Manager

Kelly has a MSc Environmental Science, MFA Digital Arts New Media. As a hybrid creative she develops experimental and short films, interactive documentaries and digital graphics that weave together the arts and sciences. 

Brett Hall – Site Manager

Brett is the Director of the UCSC Arboretum and State Board President of the California Native Plant Society and has many decades of experience sampling and growing montane as well as coastal vegetation. His experience covers botany, ecology, vegetation mapping and classification, propagation and nursery cultivation, garden and landscape design, interpretation and restoration. He is also involved coastal rare plant community conservation research. 

Mitchell Beer – Blogger & Editor

Mitchell Beer is President of Smarter Shift (www.smartershift.com), an Ottawa-based company that specializes in online content creation, management, and marketing, social media strategy design and delivery, sustainability communications, low-carbon meeting design and conference content capture.

From September 2011 through May 2013, Beer was Deputy Director of the Trottier Energy Futures Project (www.trottierenergyfutures.ca), an effort to map an 80% reduction in Canada’s energy-related greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. 

Beer traces his work as a renewable energy/energy efficiency communicator to October 1977, when he began a 3 1⁄2-year assignment as a reporter, Parliamentary correspondent, and eventually assistant editor at Canadian Renewable Energy News. 

Beer was founding chair of the GMIC Sustainable Meetings Foundation from 2011 to 2012 and served on the international board of the Green Meeting Industry Council from 2009 to 2011. He completed the global Certification in Meetings Management (CMM) in 2003.


SCIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL

 

V. Thomas Parker, PhD

Professor of Biology. San Francisco State Univeristiy. Specialties:  Plant Ecology, Community Ecology, Vegetation dynamics (dispersal, seed banks, seedling establishment, mycorrhizae), Fire Ecology, Vegetation conservation and management, Evolution and Ecology of Arctostaphylos (Ericaceae) and Ceanothus (Rhamnaceae), Tidal Wetlands, Chaparral, Mixed Evergreen Forests. Co-author with Mike Vasey on the genus Arctostaphylos for Flora of North America and the Jepson Manual of California Vegetation.

 

Michael Vasey, PhD

Interim Director, San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Biology Lecturer. San Francisco State University. Specialties include Ecology and Evolution, Tidal wetland eco-systems, fire ecology. Co-author with Tom Parker on the genus Arctostaphylos for Flora of North America and the Jepson Manual of California Vegetation.

 

Todd Keeler-Wolf, PhD

Senior Environmental Scientist. California Department of Fish and Wildlife 
Vegetation Classification and Mapping Program
Committee Chair, Vegetation Program, California Native Plant Society

 

Michael Hamilton, PhD

Director, Blue Oak Ranch Reserve, University of California, Berkeley
Conservation Biology, Ecology, Natural Areas Stewardship, Geographic Information Systems, Sensor Networks, Eco-Informatics


WORKS

 

Aside from the 4 projects currently developed by the Center for the Study of the Force Majeure, the Harrisons’ visionary projects have, on occasion, led to changes in governmental policy and have expanded dialogue around previously unexplored issues leading to practical implementations variously in the United States and Europe. There is a large body of literature on their work. 
 

The World Ocean is a Great Draftsman 1978

A High water line is drawn around the globe. The poetic text goes into some detail about what the world might look like and feel like. It ends in a question, “When catastrophe happens, will we help each other?” 35 years later the answer appears to be maybe, at best.

The Garden of Hot Winds and Warm Rains 1996

The question is asked, “What will Bonn Germany look like with a 3°C temperature rise?” Answers are suggested by Paleobotanical research, which goes back 300 billion years and finds the Dawn Redwoods and many other species that now exist. 

Greenhouse Britain 2006

An 8’ x 14’ precise model of the island of Britain with 6 projectors above it. They project on the island waters with storm surges, moving up in 2-meter increments. The idea was to democratize global warming information, by making visible what would happen to people's lands and homes as waters rose, therefore encouraging people to become planners on their own behalf.

Further detail and information about the Harrison's work can also been found at theHarrisonStudio.net